The David Brent Wolfe Dictionary of

Japanese Martial Art Terms


    - K -

  • -ka is a suffix meaning a practitioner of an art. A Judoka is a person who practices Judo. A kendoka practices kendo. A karateka practices karate.
  • Ka, , means fire.
  • Ka, , means a pouch or cave.
  • Kabe, , means a wall.
  • Kaburaya is a turnip head bulbous arrow. It makes a distinctive sound while in flight.
  • Kabuto was the traditional helmet of the samurai. They were often decorated with a sometimes elaborate crest. The Heian period and Kamakura period samurai often wore ornate helmets that were designed for protecting against opponents' arrows while using a bow and arrrow. By the 16th century C.E., the most common sort of helmet had become a cheaper, more conservative version. made of eight applied plates, that was called hachi mai bari.
  • Kachi means victorious. It is used to mean a win in a tournament.
  • Kachinuki shiai is a form of Kohaku shiai in which the winner continues to compete until defeated or a match is judged a draw.
  • Kaden are hereditary family secrets.
  • Kaeshi, , means counter or overturning of an opponent's offensive action. If preceeded by another word is is spelled as gaeshi. It comes from kaesu meaning to turn over something.
  • Kaeshi waza, , means counter technique. In sword fighting, kenjutsu, it refers to a reverse side technique.
  • Kaeshi zuki, , means a counter punch.
  • Kagashigakure jutsu means the art of hiding like a scarecrow. This is a ninjutsu skill.
  • Kagami means mirror.
  • Kagami biraki means mirror cleaning. This is the ritual first workout of the new year for a dojo.
  • Kagami geiko means mirror training. This is any partnered training exercise where the partners mirror each other actions.
  • Kagayaki, , means shining.
  • Kage, , means shadow.
  • Kage aruki jutsu means the art of silent walking. This is a ninjutsu skill.
  • Kagemushi means shadow warrior. They were individuals who acted as the double for a daimyo when his appearance on the battlefield or elsewhere needed to be feigned.
  • Kage no jutsu means the art of shadow infiltration. This is a ninjutstu skill.
  • Kagi means hook.
  • Kagi means key. In ancient Japan, keys were made of metal spiral coils.
  • Kagi jime means key strangle. It is named this because it cuts off, strangles, the nerve to the hand. It is known as second technique, nikkyo, in Aikido, second principle, nikajo, in Daito-ryu aiki jutsu, and by other names in other arts and styles.
  • Kagi zuki means key punch or hook punch. It is known as kagi zuki because it curves like an old Japanese key. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Gokyu.
  • Kaho was daimyo house law, the set of guidelines and rules by which the daimyo and his retainers operated. They were also known as kakun.
  • Kai means an association, society, or federation.
  • Kai, , means sea.
  • Kai, , means neck.
  • Kaicho, , means the owner of a school organization, i.e., Japan Karate Association or Aikikai. The head of a organized group or society.
  • Kaiden are the final teachings of a style.
  • Kaikyu shiai means a type of tournament which pits contestants of similar rank together.
  • Kaishaku was the individual who cut off the head of the person committing seppuku. This was usually a kinsman or friend ending the dying person's pain. Some kenjutsu and iai jutsu styles still retain and teach a kata for this purpose.
  • Kaisho is linear calligraphy somewhat like Western printing.
  • Kaishu means the open hand. It refers to strikes in which the hand is not clenched in a fist.
  • Kaiso is a term refering to a founder, such as the founder of Aikido.
  • Kaiten, , means rotation.
  • Kaiten juki, , means the axis of rotation of a technique.
  • Kaiten nage, , means rotary throw.
  • Kakae te is a trapping, wrapping, locking grab.
  • Kakari geiko is a Judo training method in randori to develop endurance by taking on consecutive opponents within a defined time period.
  • Kakato means the heel of the foot.
  • Kakato geri means heel kick.
  • Kake means a hook or rack. It is also written as gake.
  • Kake means execution stage of a throwing technique.
  • Kake geri means hook kick.
  • Kake te means hooking hand.
  • Kake te uke means a hooking block.
  • Kake te uke nagashi means hook and sweep block. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Yonkyu.
  • Kake uke means wrist hook block. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Shichikyu.
  • Kakitsubo means side bowl. In kyusho, vital points, this is used to describe the hollow area in the armpits.
  • Kakiwake uke means reverse wedge block. It is a two handed block using the outside of the forearms to neutralize a two handed attack. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Rokkyu.
  • Kakon is the chin.
  • Kaku, , means corner or angle.
  • Kakun were daimyo house laws, the set of guidelines and rules by which the daimyo and his retainers operated.
  • Kaku obi is a wide belt worn to support weapons being carried in or from it.
  • Kakushi means hidden weapon. It includes the hidden fist.
  • Kakushi buki means hidden weapons. Normally, it refers to all small weapons that are, or could be, hidden from sight.
  • Kakushi geri means hidden kick. It is a sweeping crescent kick that is unseen by the opponent.
  • Kakushi tsuki means hidden weapon thrust.
  • Kakushi waza refers to hidden techniques.
  • Kakusu means to hide.
  • Kakuto, , means the back of the wrist.
  • Kakuto means hand to hand combat.
  • Kakuto means crane head.
  • Kakutogi means wrestling.
  • Kakuto uke means crane head block. The block uses the back of the wrist joint as the contact surface for the technique. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Shichikyu.
  • Kaku tsuki means square thrust.
  • Kakuyoku means crane's wing. It is a term describing a type of battle formation that was used by certain 16th century C.E. daimyo. Its purpose was to envelop a retreating or surprised enemy.
  • Kama, , is a sickle. The farm version is found in karate. The samurai version is found in various koryu, traditional martial art schools. The karate style of useage is different from the koryu methods.
  • Kamae means a posture, stance or attitude.
  • Kamae gata is a ready stance.
  • Kamae te is the command for students to get into position.
  • Kame is an earthen ware jar. They were traditional training tools used to strengthen the gripping power of the hand. As the student began to be able to lift the jar by gripping the rim, sand would be added to increase the weight of the whole container.
  • Kami means upper body.
  • Kami means spirit, god, heavenly, or high. Culturally, the multiple kami were are more like ghosts than gods. They were most often believed to be deceased family members looking after the affairs of the living relatives.
  • Kamidana is the sacred shrine sometimes placed at the front of the dojo training area. Commonly, this is a small shelf with ritual symbolic items used to represent the spirit or the spirit's home.
  • Kami no ke means high of the hair, i.e., the hair on the head.
  • Kami shiho gatame means upper four corners lock. It is a Kodokan Judo pinning technique.
  • Kamishimo was formal samurai attire consisting of a kimono, hakama, and kataginu. During the Edo period, the kamishimo became more everyday wear.
  • Kami yari means a sickle spear.
  • Kamiza means seat of the spirits. In a dojo, the kamiza side is the upper side of the floor area. It sometimes contains a Shinto shrine, photographs, or a written scroll.
  • Kamiza ni rei, , means bow to kamiza.
  • Kami zeme means an upper attack.
  • Kamoku is a special class taught by a guest instructor.
  • Kampaku was the title of the regent. A regent was an individual who ruled the government until a ruler was old enough or healthy enough to assume direct rule. The Shogun were regents.
  • Kampo means Chinese medicine. The Japanese acquired knowledge of Chinese herbal medicines early in their history. So, when the Japanese talk about Chinese medicine, they are meaning herbal medicine.
  • Kan was a monetary unit of cash consisting of 1,000 mon.
  • Kan, , means intuition.
  • Kan, , means hall or building.
  • Kan means the liver. (LV)
  • Kanadaka was the value of a real estate holding expressed in a cash sum.
  • Kanbun Shinto - One of the reasons was the Kanbun Shinto effect. What happened in Kanbun = 1661 - 1673 was that Japan had not been to war for some time. Some of the Sword Sensei had a theory that a straight sword points more naturally so was desirerable. So they preached that the swords should be straight. Then some fighting happened and the Samurai with the straight swords discovered just what the Sori was for = it decreased the shock tranmitted to the wrist and arm. So the readily identifiable Kanbun Shinto swords came and went very quickly. From Jim Kurrasch, President and Newsletter Editor Nanka Token Kai = Japanese Sword Society of Southern California in an email to the Iaido-L list group.
  • Kancho, , means the owner of a school building or hall. The owner of a dojo.
  • Kan geiko means special winter training during the coldest time of the winter.
  • Kani, , means crab.
  • Kanjo was a letter of commendation issued by a daimyo to a valued retainer who had performed some valuable deed or service worthy of meritorious attention.
  • Kankai ryu was a martial art lineage that taught swimming in armor.
  • Kan ku is a phrase with kan meanng good observance and ku meaning universe or air or emptiness.
  • Kanku Dai, , is a routine or kata meaning major observing the sky form. It is required for Koyamakan Sankyu.
  • Kanku Sho, , is a routine or kata meaning minor observing the sky form. It is required for Koyamakan Nikyu.
  • Kanna-zen means introspecting the koan. A Zen concept refering to meditation which involves thinking.
  • Kanpaku was an imperial regent. It was a court rank dating from the 9th century C.E. Toyotomi Hideyoshi assumed the title in 1586 C.E. and passed it to his adopted son, Hidetsugu, in 1591 C.E.
  • Kanrei was the title of the deputy or vice shogun. The position was established in the late 14th century C.E. Later, the position was divided into two positions. One was the Kyoto Kanrei. The other was the Kanto Kanrei. The Kanto Kanrei acted as the shogun's administrative office in the Kanto region of Japan.
  • Kansetsu means knuckle or joint.
  • Kansetsu geri means joint kick, i.e., a side kick through the knee.
  • Kansetsu waza means joint locking or dislocation techniques.
  • Kanshi was the act of committing suicide in remonstration to a lord or in protest; committing suicide to get a point across.
  • Kantsui hasami uchi means hammer fists scissor strike. The hammer fists circle into a scissoring action at the opponents mid-section. An example is found in Bassai Dai kata.
  • Kanzashi means a hairpin. A long needle-like metal spike worn to hold the hair in place. They were sometimes removed from the hair and used as a dagger to provide a method of self-defense.
  • Kanzo means liver as an organ.(LV)
  • Kao means face.
  • Kao ate means face strike.
  • Kappi means lively jump.
  • Kappo, , are techniques for resuscitating people who have suffered a shock to the nervous system.
  • Kara, , is the Chinese character 'tang'. The Japanese pronounce it as 'kara' or 'to' and sometimes use it to mean the country of China. The Okinawans used this character to describe the fighting skills which they had learned from the Chinese as 'tode' or 'tote' or 'karate'. These are all different ways of saying the same characters.
  • Kara means empty or void.
  • Karade means body.
  • Karame, , means to tie up or arrest.
  • Karami, , means entwined or entanglement. It is also spelled as garami. It comes from karamu meaning to entwine or to entangle.
  • Karamiti are Okinawan trapping hand techniques.
  • Karate means China hand, , or empty hand depending on the characters used. It sounds the same with either set of characters. Most Okinawan karate instructors changed from using the China hand characters during the 1920's and 1930's to using the empty hand characters due to the political climate of this period in Japan. For various reasons, the Japanese of this time period tended to look down upon all things Chinese. Therefore, to gain popularity, the Okinawans swapped characters for a non-political one.
  • Karate-do means the way of karate.
  • Karate gi means the uniform normally used while practicing karate.
  • Karate-jutsu, , means the art of karate.
  • Karateka means a person who practices karate.
  • Karo were clan elders. They were trusted retainers of a daimyo whose service hopefully was long and loyal.
  • Karui means light.
  • Karui geiko, , means a light easy practice.
  • Karuma means wheel. It is also spelled as garuma.
  • Karuma, , is a sword posture with the sword held horizontal and back along the side.
  • Kashaki uchi, , means continous attack.
  • Kashi is the wood, Japanese oak. Oak is frequently used for Japanese weapons due to its hardness.
  • Kashi, , means legs.
  • Kashin was a retainer or vassel.
  • Kashindan was a daimyo's band of retainers.
  • Kashira means mask. It is the pommel fitted over the end of the handle.
  • Kashira ate means mask striking. It is a generic term for any strike using the pommel of the weapon as the hitting surface.
  • Kassatsu is the spine or the middle of the back.
  • Kasso teki is the term for the imaginary opponent in iaido and iai jutsu. He is always your own size. The sword is aimed at the cener of the opponent.
  • Kasumi, , means dim, blurred, hazy, or mist.
  • Kasumi means the temple area on the side of the head.
  • Kasumi, , means the arms are crossed over to hide the actual technique setup. It is sometimes used to mean a feint.
  • Kata, , means shoulder or shoulder area of the upper back.
  • Kata, , means single or one of a pair.
  • Kata, , means to shape or the style of a form.
  • Kata, , means a model, prearranged set, form, or routine. A prearranged set of movements used to teach a student how to perform a technique.
  • Kata ashi means single leg or one foot.
  • Katachi means correct form. It refers to 'form only'. Applied in training which requires only basic movement without the full effect.
  • Kata dori, , means shoulder grab.
  • Kata gassho means single-handed prayer position. One hand opened vertically in front of the chest with the palm towards the side.
  • Kata gatame, , means shoulder lock. It is a Kodokan Judo pinning technique. It is also an aiki budo throw as a variation of the throw kaiten nage. This lock is also known as taki otosu odori.
  • Kataginu was a stiff shouldered sleeveless jacket worn by the samurai over a kimono along with the hakama for formal situations. It is commonly seen in Edo period drawings of the samurai.
  • Kata guchi means the top of the shoulder.
  • Kataha means one half
  • Kataha jime means half strangle. It is a Kodokan Judo strangling technique.
  • Kata hiza, , means one knee.
  • Kata hiza dachi is a posture done kneeling on only one knee.
  • Katai means hard or stiff
  • Katai means the lower half of the torso, from the waist down.
  • Kata juji jime means half cross strangle. It is a Kodokan Judo strangling technique.
  • Katakake is an arm bar, a joint lock against the elbow.
  • Kataki means an opponent.
  • Katame, , means grappling or lock. Also known as gatame.
  • Katame no kata, , is a Kodokan Judo prearranged routine called 'forms of grappling'.
  • Katame waza, , means grappling techniques.
  • Katana is the traditional long curved sword of the samurai constructed through the folding and refolding of a bar of hot metal thousands of times. They are reknowned for their toughness and cutting ability. The katana replaced the straight sword during the later Kamakura period. Until then, the bow and arrow had been the primary battlefield weapon.
  • Katanagari was a term used to describe the confiscation of weapons from all non-samurai at the end of the 16th century C.E.
  • Katanakaji is the term meaning sword smith. It status was at the top of the artisan class.
  • Kata nashi means that nothing of value will come of it.
  • Katanatogi means a sword sharpener. This craftsman sharpened and polished the sword blade.
  • Kata otoshi means shoulder drop. In Aikido, this technique is called ikkyo.
  • Katasaki is the point of the shoulder.
  • Kata shime means shoulder constriction. It is also written as kata jime.
  • Katsuninken means life giving sword.
  • Katate, , means a single hand.
  • Katate dori, , means one hand grab (same side, right to left or left to right).
  • Katate osae, , means single handed press.
  • Katate tori, , is the same as katate dori.
  • Katate uchi, , means one handed strike.
  • Katate waza, , means a single hand technique. Can be used in refering to a long sword, katana, cutting technique.
  • Kate means a win
  • Katei means currriculum.
  • Katsu, , is a method of resuscitating a person who has lost consciousness due to strangulation or shock.
  • Katsujin no ken means the sword or fist, depending upon the characters used, that takes life.
  • Katsugi waza, , is a shouldering the sword technique.
  • Katsuri means speed.
  • Katsuse Yoshimitsu Kagehiro is the 15th Soke, headmaster, of the Suio Ryu, a traditional Japanese martial arts school including ken jutsu, iai jutsu, jo jutsu, naginata jutsu, kusarigama jutsu, and kogusoku techniques. It is said to date from the early 1600's C.E. The headquarters, known as the Hekiunkan, is located in Shimizu, Japan.
  • Kawashi means evasion.
  • Kaze, , means wind.
  • Kaze Arashi-Ryu is a jujutsu style having movements which are similar to a hurricane or tornado. This gives the opponent little chance to counter the techniques.
  • Keage means snapping or whipping upward.
  • Keage geri means a snapping kick.
  • Kebiki odoshi was a type of close lacing used to construct armor.
  • Kega means an injury.
  • Kegutsu were fur boots popular with high ranking samurai during the Heian period. They were often made of bear fur. By the Edo period, they had fallen out of fashion and had become rare.
  • Kei means formal.
  • Kei is a system or line. It can refer to a familial lineage or a guild lineage.
  • Keibu seimyaku is the jugular vein.
  • Keichu is the atemi waza point on the back of the neck at the base of the cerebellum.
  • Kei domyaku is the carotid artery located on the sides of the neck.
  • Keiko has the fingertips joined to form a chicken beak hand. The Chinese call this technique crane's beak.
  • Keiko, , means practice.
  • Keikogi means a practice uniform.
  • Keiko hajime means beginning practice.
  • Keikoken means a foreknuckle, index finger knuckle, fist. The Chinese call this a phoenix eye fist.
  • Keikoku means warning.
  • Keiko osame means final practice. It is the last class of the end of the year.
  • Keiraku means channel, pathway, or meridian.
  • Keirei means a formal bow.
  • Keiseimachi means the district of destroyers of cities. These were pleasure areas in cities for the courtesans. These red light districts were grudgingly permitted by the Tokugawa bakufu during the Edo period. They catered to all the social classes.
  • Kei-sohei
  • were lightly equiped soldiers, ie. light infantry.
  • Keito is a kenjutsu term for the sword held in a position at the left side as if it were being held in the belt, obi. The thumb is placed on the guard, tsuba, ready to release the sword from the scabbard.
  • Keito is the upper part of the thumb used for striking an opponent.
  • Keito uke means chicken head block. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Yonkyu.
  • Kekomi means thrusting.
  • Kekomi geri means trusting kick.
  • Kempo means fist way or fist law. It is a generic Chinese term, chuan-fa describing fighting styles using the fist.
  • Ken, , means sword. As a type of sword, it was a pre-9th century C.E. double edged straight sword.
  • Ken means fist. It is the same as the kem in kempo.
  • Kendo, , means the way of the sword. It is implied that the sword is already drawn. The usage of this term by what is meant currently dates to 1895 C.E.
  • Kenjutsu, , means sword art, ie. sword fighting. The practice and study of fighting with a sword.
  • Kenko jutsu means health restoration art.
  • Kenkokotsu means the shoulder blades.
  • Kenkyuka means a seminar.
  • Kenkyukai means research association.
  • Kenkyusha means a rearcher.
  • Ken no sen means to initiate an attack.
  • Kenpo is the same as Kempo.
  • Kensei is a technique performed with a silent kiai, , or shout.
  • Kenshusei is a research student specially chosen for advanced study.
  • Ken tori means sword grabbing. These are techniques to take away an opponent's sword.
  • Ken tsui means hammer fist. It is done by striking with the little finger side of the fist.
  • Ken tsui uchi means hammer fist strike. This technique is also known as tettsui uchi. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Hachikyu.
  • Ken uke means fist block. It is using the fist to intercept and deflect an attack by using a punch.
  • Ken zen ichi is an Okinawan karate saying translated as the fist and zen are one.
  • Keppan means blood seal as a method of swearing an oath. Traditionally, it is done by cutting the fourth finger on the left hand with a knife and smearing the resultant blood on an oath below the signer's signature or chop. Some involved signing in one's own blood.
  • Kerai was a retainer.
  • Keri, , is the same as geri in meaning a kick.
  • Keri age means a rising kick. It is done by using the knee as the striking surface.
  • Keri gaeshi means counter kick or returning kick.
  • Keri komi means to kick and then step into the opening created by the kick.
  • Keri waza means kicking technique(s).
  • Kesa, , is the blanket which Buddhist monks wear over one shoulder and tied at together at the opposite hip. It is sometimes translated as scarf. It was sometimes worn over the armor by samurai who were also Buddhist monks.
  • Kesa gatame, , means scarf lock. The kesa is the blanket which Buddhist monks wear over one shoulder and tied at together at the opposite hip. It is a Kodokan Judo pinning technique.
  • Kesa giri means a diagonial downward cut with bladed weapon across the body through the line where a kesa would be worn. A gyaku kesa giri is a diagonial upward cut.
  • Kesa uchi is a diagonal downward strike.
  • Ketsuryoku means effort.
  • Ki means breath, air, or energy.
  • Kiai, , means to shout or yell with spirit, not what is shouted. If you hear someone yelling 'kiai', they are yelling 'shout.' Various arts and styles have shouts specific to their arts and styles.
  • Kiba dachi means horse straddling stance. It is a requirement for Koyamakan karate Shichikyu.
  • Kichigai means a maniac or insane person.
  • Kichigaikan means a training hall for maniacs.
  • Kiesareta uke means disappearing reception. A generic term for techniques where the receiving, i.e. block, technique is not seen nor perceived as a threat to the attacker.
  • Ki-gurai is a noun mean strength derived from self-confidence. Also, an ability to perceive an opponent's attack. By Inoue Yoshihiko in Kendo Kata: Essence and Application.
  • Kihon, , means basic or fundamental techniques.
  • Kihon kote waza means basic wrist techniques.
  • Kihon kumite means a method of basic sparring consisting of a number of pre-arranged movements done with a partner. Normally the basic attack is done an odd number of times, such as five, three, or once, with the defender counter attacking after the final attack.
  • Kihon renshu means the fundamental practice of basic elements necessary to establish good technique.
  • Kihon waza means basic or fundamental technique(s).
  • Kikan is the trachea or throat.
  • Kikan uchi means a strike to the trachea.
  • Kiken means renunciation or to submit by tapping out.
  • Kikkosha was a wheeled, armored device used to protect as many as 12 warriors as they attacked a walled fort.
  • Kiku means chrysanthemum. The flower is used as an imperial symbol. A white chrysanthemum with a red center is used as the symbol of Kodokan Judo.
  • Kiku means lower.
  • Kime means the focusing of one's energy at the end point of a technique such as a punch, block, or kick.
  • Kime waza means a finishing technique.
  • Kimono is a type of Japanese clothing. Basicly it is a long robe. Sometimes, it is very plain. Women sometimes wear very elaborate kimono that may cost thousands of U.S. dollars.
  • Kin, , means the testicles.
  • Ki nagare means a circular energy flow.
  • Ki nagashi means a circular energy flow.
  • Kin geri, , means a groin kick normally done using the instep.
  • Kinhin means walking meditation.
  • Kinniku means muscles.
  • Kinpatsu, , means blond haired.
  • Ki no nagare means flowing techniques.
  • Kinsa is used as a competition term meaning a slight superiority. Kinsa refers to a marginal inequality between people. It is as if you weigh them in your hands, and one is slightly more. There is a subtle difference between them that makes you evaluate the one higher. This implies that the kinsa may not even be something you can verbalize or identify by specifying a technique that they did or something. You may have just liked their style or something. By Steve Cunningham 14 May 1997.
  • Ki o tsukete means attention or be careful.
  • Kinteki is the groin.
  • Kiri means to cut.
  • Kiri age means rising cut.
  • Kiristu means stand up.
  • Kiri-sute gomen means permission to kill and depart. This was a Tokugawa period privilege of the warrior caste, the samurai. They were supposed to report the killing to the local police before leaving.
  • Kiseru was a long handled wooden tobacco pipe that became popular among the samurai during the late 16th century C.E.
  • Kiri te means cutting hand. It is a sword fighting term for when the back of the wrist, at the thumb, is straight. The thumb of the right hand should be touching the second finger and matching pads with the index finger. If your thumb is above, toward the guard, the index finger you are gripping the handle too square across the palm and the edge of the sword will not reach the opponent. The cut is made using the muscles between the shoulder blades, while opening, or expanding, the chest. You do not try to cut by flexing the wrist, but with the back muscles.
  • Kishu conveys the meaning of a family's social lineage or pedigree. It carrys a strong sense of social status, almost to the extent of being caste-like in the psychological limits it places on personal aspirations. Sugawara Michizane turned down an appointment to chancellor in the government because he was not born into a high enough kishu status family.
  • Kitae means forging.
  • Kito-Ryu is the 'rise fall' style of jujutsu. It was one of the ancestors of Kodokan Judo mastered by Dr. Jigoro Kano. The pair of opposites are expressions of yin and yang, the two basic types of natural energy in Asian cosmology. Using them both in the name of the ryu demonstrates that the ryu is all encompassing, that all types of attack and defense are utilized.
  • Kiza, , means kneeling, but up on the balls of the feet. This is called live toes.
  • Kizami geri means cutting kick. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Gokyu.
  • Kizami zuki is a jab punch.
  • Ko means red.
  • Ko, , means tiger.
  • Ko, , means small, minor, or short.
  • Ko, , means ancient or old.
  • Ko, , means behind.
  • Ko, , means fox.
  • Ko, , means high, tall, or expensive.
  • Ko, , means a light ray.
  • Ko, , means mouth or oral.
  • Ko, , means retrospect or to look back.
  • Ko means filal piety, especially to one's lord.
  • Ko means back of the fist.
  • Ko ashi means to walk in little steps.
  • Kobaya was a small open roofed ship manned by 20 oarsmen during the Japanese medieval period.
  • Ko bo ichi means attack and defense are one. It is the concept of the attack-defense connection being a single unit of action.
  • Kobudo means ancient fighting way. It usually is referring to non-battlefield use of weapons in self defense.
  • Kobu jutsu means ancient fighting art.
  • Ko dachi means a small sword. This is the companion to the o dachi, large sword carried by the samurai.
  • Kodansha means high grade black belts at 5th degree and above.
  • Koden, , means oral transmission.
  • Koden means ancient transmission.
  • Kodokan means hall for studying the way. The home school for Judo located in Tokyo, Japan was founded in December 1882. A previous school by this name was established by Mito Tokugawa for the training of the samurai.
  • Koe, , means voice or tone.
  • Kogai is a skewer. Sometimes they are found as a part of a scabbard.
  • Koga kubo was the rank by which the Kanto region Ashikaga branch was known.
  • Kogan geri means the instep (top of the foot) kick. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Shichikyu.
  • Koga ninja means ninja of the Koga clan.
  • Kogatana means small blade. It is a small knife carried in a built in sheath as a part of a scabbard.
  • Kogeki means attack or an offensive strike.
  • Kogi means lectures.
  • Kohai, , means another person junior to oneself.
  • Kohaku shiai means a red and white tournament.
  • Koho ukemi means rear falling method.
  • Koi guchi means carp's mouth. It is the term used to mean the scabbard opening where the sword is slid into the scabbard.
  • Kojiri is the fitting at the end of the scabbard.
  • Kojo undo means weight training.
  • Kokei means a succesor.
  • Koken means wrist. It is used in karate to mean the back of the bent wrist.
  • Koken tsuki means bent wrist thrust.
  • Kokka was the region that a daimyo directly ruled.
  • Koko, , means tiger mouth. It is the fleshy arc between the thumb and index finger. (LI-4)
  • Kokoro, , means spirit-heart. In Japanese culture the spirit is in the heart. It is also used to mean will, mood, or intuition.
  • Kokoro-e is an atttitude of mind in sincere understanding and appreciation of values.
  • Kokoro kamae means mental attitude.
  • Kokotsu means the shin bone.
  • Koko uke means tiger mouth block. It is the region of the hand between the thumb and the index finger. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Yonkyu.
  • Koku was a unit of rice that was used to measure an individual's wealth and a farm's theoretical productivity. A koku was considered the amount of rice that one individual needed to eat to live for one year, about 180 liters. a daimyo owned property that generated al least 10,000 koku annually. A low ranking samurai retainer might be paid 100 koku by his daimyo annually during the Edo period. Larger productive farm lands permitted daimyo to hire more samurai who in turn increased the power of a daimyo. More power permitted the daimyo to increase his land holdings.
  • Kokudaka was the value of a real estate holding as expressed in koku of rice.
  • Kokujin was a Muromachi period term meaning a man of the province. It was used to describe rural locally powerful samurai families. Because they were often not far removed from the peasantry in terms of priorities and concerns, they were for all intents and purposes very much like the jizamurai.
  • Kokutsu means backward leaning.
  • Kokutsu dachi means back stance. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Hachikyu.
  • Kokyu means breath.
  • Kokyu chikara means internal strength.
  • Kokyudosa, , is a seated aikido exercise dealing with a two handed grab.
  • Kokyuho means breathing way or method. It is a method of breathing where inhalation is done on upward and inward motions and exhalation is done with downward and outward motions.
  • Kokyu nage means breath throw.
  • Kokyu tanden ho is a seated aikido exercise from a two handed grab.
  • Komaku was a armored shelter used to protect an archer from opponents.
  • Koman kai is a board of advisors.
  • Komban-wa means good evening.
  • Komekami means the cheek bone.
  • Komi means within or against.
  • Komi, , means drawing near or coming close.
  • Kongo, , is a posture with a blade held vertically in front of one's own face.
  • Konida bugyo was the samurai charged with supervising the movement of the supply train. It was not a very heroic duty. But, it is a very important part of moving an army.
  • Konidatai was the supply and baggage caravan for an army in the field.
  • Konnichi-wa means good afternoon.
  • Koppu means cupping. It is a health restoration technique used to draw off excess energy from an individual.
  • Kori is the area of the foot around the toes.
  • Kori was a subsection, a district, of a provnice, kuni.
  • Koroshi, , means to kill or death blow. It is sometimes used to mean a delayed death touch technique.
  • Ko-ryu, , means an ancient or old stream, this is taken to mean an ancient school(s) or lineage. These are usually considered to be schools which existed before the beginning of Meiji, 1865 C.E.; some say they have to be a couple of hundred years old or more.
  • Koryu is shifting the body away from an opponent into a front stance.
  • Kosa means lecture.
  • Kosa means crossed.
  • Kosa dachi means crossed leg stance. It is a requirement for Koyamakan Shichikyu.
  • Kosa dori, , means cross handed grab (opposite sides, right to right or left to left).
  • Kosei, , means offensive.
  • Kosei o gaisuru koi is a kendo contest term for an illegal act or move. It is given a hansoku, a penalty for a violation of the contest rules.
  • Koshi means ball of the foot.
  • Koshi, , means hip, loin, waist, same word as goshi.
  • Koshi guruma, , means hip wheel. It is a Kodokan Judo throwing technique.
  • Koshi hineri, , means hip twist. It is a technique to generate power.
  • Koshiki no kata is a Kodokan Judo routine called forms of antique.
  • Koshigatana means a short sword normally between 12 and 24 inches long.
  • Koshi ita, , is the small back plate on the traditional wide legged pants, hakama.
  • Koshin means rearward.
  • Koshi nage, , means hip throw.
  • Koshi o ireru means to put in the hips as a way of drawing power from the proper movement of the hips.
  • Koshi waza, , means hip techniques.
  • Kosho Ryu Kempo means old pine tree style fist law. It is the name of the martial art style taught by James Mitose in Hawaii and California. Most American kempo styles trace their lineage to this style.
  • Ko soto gake means minor outside clip. It is a Kodokan Judo throwing technique.
  • Ko soto gari means minor outside reap. It is a Kodokan Judo throwing technique.
  • Kotae means change.
  • Kote means the forearm or wrist.
  • Kote gaeshi, , means forearm reversal refering to reversing the normal position of the forearm. The little finger side of the hand is turned up and then out away from the body.
  • Kote hiniri, , means turning the forearm in its normal direction. It is a technique found in various jujutsu styles, aikido, and Kodokan Judo.
  • Kote kitae means forearm forging, toughening of the forearm.
  • Kote mawashi, , means wrist turn or wrist rotation. It is an old jujutsu technique.
  • Kote ori means wrist break.
  • Koten shiai is a form of competition requiring no teams and useful in individual evaluations.
  • Ko tsuka means small handle. It is the name of the handle of a kogatana, a small knife carried in a scabbard.
  • Ko uchi gari means minor inside reap. It is a Kodokan Judo throwing technique.
  • Ko uke is a crane block or arch block.
  • Ko waza, , means minor or small technique requiring only a slight amount of body movement.
  • Koyamakan, , means small mountain hall. A small karate style having forms similar to Okinawan Shorin-ryu and Goju-ryu versions. Most of the kata names are the current Japanese versions. The emphasis is on technical excellence expressed through strong, smoothly flowing kata. Sporting aspects are not stressed. Due to the number of police officers and military officers in the style, individual combat effiency has continued to be the main focus of training.
  • Koyatte means do it like this.
  • Ko yubi, , means the little finger.
  • Kozo means structure.
  • Kozuka means a small knife. Sometimes small knives were fitted in to a sword scabbard as an additional tool.
  • Ku, , means nine.
  • Ku, , means air, sky, emptyness, or void.
  • Kubi, , means neck.
  • Kubi bukuro means head bag. It was a net bag used to carry the heads of defeated enemies.
  • Kubi naka, , is the atemi waza point at the base of the skull.
  • Kubishime, , means a neck choke.
  • Kubo sama is the term used by the ordinary people to refer to the shogun.
  • Kuchi means mouth.
  • Kuchibiru means the lip.
  • Kuchi bushi means mouth warrior. It is an insult meaning an individual who talks like a warrior but doesn't have the skills to perform as a warrior.
  • Kudaki, , means to break, smash, shatter, or to destroy.
  • Kudan, , means nineth degree black belt.
  • Kuden means oral teaching.
  • Kuge means a courtier or court noble in the Emperor's court.
  • Kuge seiken means courtier government. This is used to mean the early Japanese government run from the imperial court. Kuge seiken is what preceded the warrior government, buke seiken, of the shoguns.
  • Kugi nuki means pincers or scissors throw. An old jujutsu throwing technique. A printed example can be found in the old text, The Text-Book of Jujutsu, by S. K. Uyenishi.
  • Kuguri, , means to hide or submerge.
  • Kugyo were the high nobility.
  • Kuji was services rendered in corvee labor. Frequently, it was a requirement to send men for work in the provinces clearing forests for farm land and road building.
  • Kujiki, , means to crush, shatter, or strain.
  • Kuki, , means air.
  • Kukishin Ryu is a traditional martial arts ryu specializing in pole arms, such as the rokushakubo, six foot staff, and the hanbo, half staff.
  • Kukyo means nineth principle.
  • Kukyu, , means nineth class.
  • Kuma, , means bear.
  • Kumade, , means bear hand. The palm is held flat with the finger hooked.
  • Kume is the command to grab each other during contest.
  • Kumi means a set.
  • Kumi ai means grappling.
  • Kumijo, , means stick meeting. It is an Aikido and jujutsu paired jo exercise.
  • Kumikata are methods of grabbing the opponent.
  • Kumi odori is traditional Okinawan weapons dancing.
  • Kumitachi, , means sword meetings. It is a paired bokken exercise.
  • Kumite means hands meeting. It is used to mean free style sparring or fighting.
  • Kumi uchi is a term meaning grappling.
  • Kunai was a tool used by the ninja as a sometimes weapon.
  • Kuni was a province in Japan.
  • Kunoichi are female ninja.
  • Kura, , means to receive a blow.
  • Kurigata is the knob on the scabbard where the cord, sageo, attaches to the traditional wide legged pants, hakama.
  • Kuro, , means black.
  • Kuro obi, , means black belt.
  • Kuruma, , means wheel.
  • Kururunfa, , is a Goju-Ryu routine, kata meaning holding ground.
  • Kuruwa was the term for a castle compound.
  • Kusa, , means grass or weeds.
  • Kusari fundo is a short weighted chain used as a weapon. This weapon was used by the ninja.
  • Kusari gama is a short bladed weapon attached to a short handle at an angle, similar to a farming sickle, with a chain attached to the handle. This weapon was used by both the samurai and the ninja. The chain or weighted rope would be used to entangle an opponent. Then the sickle would be used to kill the opponent.
  • Kushin, , means to spring in to attack an opponent.
  • Kussinuke, , means to dodge an attack.
  • Kusuri means medicine.
  • Kusuri yubi means medicine finger. This is the ring finger, the finger next to the little finger.
  • Kutaku means the inner wrist.
  • Kuzure means modified or broken position.
  • Kuzushi means means breaking the opponent's balance or centeredness.
  • Kyo, , means chance.
  • Kyo means full or excessive.
  • Kyo, , means chest.
  • Kyo, , means armpit.
  • Kyobu means chest.
  • Kyobu geri means chest kick.
  • Kyogetsu shogei is a bladed weapon combining a knife with a edged hook. They were used by the ninja.
  • Kyoka means the curriculum of a style of martial arts.
  • Kyokotsu means the sternum.
  • Kyosei means a student teacher.
  • Kyosen means the sternum, the area of the rib cage between the base of the throat and the solar plexus.
  • Kyoshi, , is a teacher of teachers, a knowledgeable person. The middle of the teaching titles. It is awarded by various organizations to senior teachers in different Japanese martial arts. The ZNKR requires that an individual be at least a 7th dan in kendo or iaido before being awarded this teaching title.
  • Kyoshi no kamae is a kneeling posture.
  • Kyouryoku, , means strength.
  • Kyu, , means a class of student below black belt level.
  • Kyuba no michi means the way of the horse and bow, ie. horseback archery. It is a Heian period and Kamakura period term for martial values.
  • Kyudo means the way of archery. It is the modern, contemplative form of shooting an arrow at a target.
  • Kyuju dairi is a traditional teaching license in some of the classical Japanese martial arts.
  • Kyu jutsu means the art of archery.
  • Kyusho, , means pressure or vital points.
  • Kyusho jutsu, , means vital point striking found in Okinawan karate.
  • Kyusho waza, , means pressure point techniques.

David Brent Wolfe
This page was last modified on May 9, 2005 C.E.
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